Our Research

More information on The Structure of Skyscrapers, my history of the development of tall-building structural technology put to 1900, is at the link above. Or click on the book cover below. More information on City of Brick and Steel, our guide to the structure of buildings in New York City, is at the link above. …

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A Preservation Masterclass

I probably should have put this up sooner, but here we are. On Tuesday, noon Greenwich Time, I’ll be delivering a virtual lecture – in UK-speak, a masterclass – for the Scottish Center for Conservation. The title is Conservation of “Unimportant” Buildings, and I’ll be discussing the intersection of historic preservation philosophy and ordinary buildings. …

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High Steel at Queensboro

No great insight with these pictures, but they’re fun to look at. Above, working on the roadway of the Queensboro Bridge in 1907. This angle emphasizes the “blacksmith’s shop” aspect of the bridge. Seen in profile, it’s not quite so overwhelming: But the highlight is this view, also 1907, of ironworkers on top of the …

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An NYC Cowboy

Long before Urban Cowboy there were urban cowboys. The official title of the 1900 photo above is “Railroad Signalman on 11th Ave., N. Y.” but those horsemen were commonly known as railroad cowboys. The original New York Central ran west from Albany, and as such was central to upstate New York. When the Cornelius Vanderbilt, …

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High Steel At Met Life

Continuing yesterday’s discussion of construction methods, today’s an OSHA nightmare. The nightmare starts with the picture above, where we have four steel workers high up without fall protection, hard hats, eye protection, proper gloves, and so on. They’re some 400 feet up erecting the frame of the Met Life Tower, the tallest building in the …

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A Different Take On Curtain Walls At Penn Station

I used the picture above once before to discuss the hole in front of Penn Station, which eventually became the Hotel Pennsylvania. Because the hotel was not yet built, this photo provides one of the few nearly-head-on views of the east facade of the station, on Seventh Avenue, which was its main facade. This is …

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