Our Research

More information on The Structure of Skyscrapers, my history of the development of tall-building structural technology put to 1900, is at the link above. Or click on the book cover below. More information on City of Brick and Steel, our guide to the structure of buildings in New York City, is at the link above. …

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Tunkhannock and the End of the Line

So after masonry, wood, iron, and steel viaducts, what’s left? The 1912 Tunkhannock Viaduct, above, constructed to eliminate a sloped and winding valley passage by the Delaware, Lackawanna and Western Railroad (AKA, the Lackawanna), is entirely concrete. It’s a spectacular structure in general, with ten 180-foot arch spans, and with the deck up to 240 feet …

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Starrucca and the Historical Sequence of Materials

I’ve talked in the past about metal railroad viaducts and wood railroad viaducts, so I guess I’ll round out the collection with masonry today and concrete tomorrow. That’s the Starrucca Viaduct, in northeastern Pennsylvania near the New York border, completed in 1848 for the main line of Erie Railroad. It’s entirely made of stone and …

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An Option

That’s a small commercial building in downtown Stamford, Connecticut. I was not trying for an arty photo, just angling so that the glaze on the architectural terra cotta could be seen. To be clear: the first floor storefront is black marble veneer, probably with brick behind it; the second, third, and fourth floors have terra …

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It Looked Familiar: Misleading

Above, from a 2012 issue of The Defenders: Dr. Strange, the Black Cat, and the Silver Surfer in what is obviously the abandoned City Hall Station on the IRT. Here’s the station as it looked when construction was almost complete: Note that there’s only one track because this was the southern terminal station and it …

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The Quiet Life

There are two reasons that I chose to write about the Wisconsin-Michigan Railroad Bridge over the Menominee River between the two states. The first reason is that it’s a good example of the small truss bridges that were built everywhere in the US in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Wagner, Wisconsin, and Lake, …

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